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Cagliero11 and Salesian Missionary Intention - August 2018

CAGLIERO11 and SALESIAN MISSIONARY INTANTION - AUGUST 2018

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Salesian Missionary Intention

Per le vocazioni religiose alla vita salesiana
Per i Salesiani in Oceania

So that the Salesian Family may be able to witness to and proclaim the Gospel of the Family in Oceania.

Cultural, economic and political elements greatly influence the lives of families in Oceania, as anywhere else in the world. There is a great need to protect the treasure of the institution of the family, as the foundation of all Christian values and a school of humanity.

N. 116 - August 2018 Newsletter for Salesian Missionary Animation Publication of the Missions Sector for the Salesian Communities and Friends of the Salesian Mission

We find in the Maximum Illud of Pope Benedict XV, a clear directive on the urgency of forming "the missionary", that is, to adequately train every agent of evangelization. References to possible "deformations" of the missionary are very explicit ("avarice", "craze for profit"). Today we may have to add expressions such as nationalism, colonialism or mission as mere material and social development. In this context, the "disinterestedness", universality, and above all, the spirituality and holiness of life of the missionary are strongly emphasized: "it is necessary that he who preaches be a man of God”, who "burns with charity".

The Salesian Congregation continues to grow in awareness and in its explicit commitment to the "Missionary Formation of the Salesians of Don Bosco" (Rome 2013). This commitment continues to be a strong priority for the sons of Don Bosco.

The study of missiology and the acquisition of qualifications in it, as well as in the sciences that have a direct bearing on our commitment to evangelization ad gentes, are to be given even greater importance in the Congregation.

Fr. Guillermo Basañes, SDB
Councillor for the Missions

LEAVEN GROUPS

We continue to present this experience of missionary groups from the Pontifical Mission Societies. This good practice can enlighten us and motivate us to create missionary groups or movements within our own youth ministry.
The “leaven groups” are those in which young people, whose personal and community formation enables them to project their human, Christian and missionary commitment into their environment and beyond. Each group consists of twelve young people in the manner of the apostles of Jesus. The groups choose their own animators who, through their way of life and missionary animation, help the members to grow. Twice a year or annually they may change the young person who offers this service. Everyone, in one way or another, must exercise leadership and serve the group. The group names itself after a missionary or something that indicates the missionary orientation.
Services provided by the missionary leaven groups:
? Projection of the young person within the family, the school, the group of friends, the parish, the neediest, society in general as someone with a universal outlook.
? Participation in the animation of the Mission Days (World Mission Day, Pontifical Work of St. Peter the Apostle, Missionary Childhood and Pontifical Missionary Union).
? Cooperation of the young in the universal mission, and among the young people themselves, in the month of October; on Mission Sunday, to promote the National Day of Missionary Youth.
? Accompaniment of youth groups or groups of missionary childhood.
? Promotion and organization of live-ins and other missionary activities for young people.
? Training of teams for mission dioceses or for other places in need.
? Spiritual and material support for priestly and religious vocations in mission lands, through the Pontifical Society of Saint Peter the Apostle.
? Dissemination of the journals and missionary aids of the Pontifical Mission Societies.
? Links to the parish mission committee and the Diocesan Office for the Missions
? Participation in and weekly animation of the Sunday Eucharist at the parish.
? Offering "a year of missionary service" "without borders" as a support for the evangelization of fallen-away Catholics or for bringing the Gospel to those who have not ever received it.

LEAVEN GROUPS We continue to present this experience
of missionary groups from the Pontifical Mission Societies. This good practice can enlighten us and motivate us to create missionary groups or movements within our own youth ministry.
The “leaven groups” are those in which young people, whose personal and community formation enables them to project their human,
Christian and missionary commitment into their environment and beyond. Each group consists of twelve young people in the manner of the apostles of Jesus. The groups choose their own animators who, through their way of life and missionary animation, help the members to Twice a year or annually they may change the young person who offers this service. Everyone, in one way or another, must exercise leadership and serve the group. The group names itself after a missionary or something that indicates the missionary orientation.
Services provided by the missionary leaven groups:
? Projection of the young person within the family, the school, the group of friends, the parish, the neediest, society in general as someone with a universal outlook.
? Participation in the animation of the Mission Days (World Mission Day, Pontifical Work of St. Peter the Apostle, Missionary Childhood and Pontifical Missionary Union).
? Cooperation of the young in the universal mission, and among the young people themselves, in the month of October; on Mission Sunday, to promote the National Day of Missionary Youth.
? Accompaniment of youth groups or groups of missionary childhood.
? Promotion and organization of live-ins and other missionary activities for young people.
? Training of teams for mission dioceses or for other places in need.
? Spiritual and material support for priestly and religious vocations in mission lands, through the Pontifical Society of Saint Peter the Apostle.
? Dissemination of the journals and missionary aids of the Pontifical Mission Societies.
? Links to the parish mission committee and the Diocesan Office for the Missions
? Participation in and weekly animation of the Sunday Eucharist at the parish.
? Offering "a year of missionary service" "without borders" as a support for the evangelization of fallen-away Catholics or for bringing the Gospel to those who have not ever received it.

Commitments:
? Missionary witness of authentic young Christian life and sacramental life.
? Participation in the weekly training and other activities with missionary themes.
? Daily prayer for missions all over the world.
? Cultivation of ones missionary vocation.
? Evangelization "beyond borders" by animating other young people.
? A personal offering for the missions, to deliver it in October to the fund for the
Propagation of the Faith and the Works of Saint Peter the Apostle.

New missionary in Samoa

T he Vietnamese have a proverb "Th?i gian vun vút nh? thoi ??a" (Time flies). Yes, time passes without waiting for anyone and it never comes back. I have now spent almost two years in the missions. Many things were strange to me at the beginning, but now I am getting used to missionary life here in this beautiful country, Samoa.
I first set foot on this soil on November 13, 2016, after a flight from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and transiting through Hong Kong and Fiji. From up in the sky you can see that this is a beautiful land, God’s own creation: two large islands surrounded by the Pacific Ocean. At close range, it is easy to see the waves that hit the coral reefs that surround the islands, making the scene extremely beautiful. Samoa has an area of 2,842 km2 (very small land), with about 200
thousand inhabitants. Agriculture and tourism are the two main pillars of the economy. Catholics form 19%
of the population.
To start with, I was more than a little surprised by some habits here. First of all, the community usually spends at least 30 minutes before dinner talking to each other and discussing all the events of the day.
Secondly, when you visit peoples homes, they are usually very hospitable and invite you to have a meal with their family. Before the meal they give the guests a bowl of water to wash their hands with. Guests are honoured by being invited to sit at the table with the parents while the children eat at another table.
During the meal, one person is there only to serve the food. Someone else fans fresh air on to the guests and parents. After the meal they provide another bowl of water to the guests to wash their hands with.
They have a variety of dishes, but the "Talo" is the staple food.
We have two communities in Samoa. One is on the island of Upolu. Six confreres take care of a professional school of about 300 students and a parish with three churches. The other community is on the island of Savaii. The four confreres are in charge of a high school and a vocational centre with about 300 students and a parish with three churches. I spent my first two months in Upolu and then I moved to Savaii Island where I am now.
My main responsibility last year was to teach computer science to 9th grade students. I also took care of the computer lab and saw to the school bulletin board. I am very happy to have the opportunity to work directly with the students. They are very good and honest. They have a good attitude towards their teachers. They always carry out enthusiastically any chores that the school or community entrusts them with. I am very happy in this mission and I would like you to be happy too!

Peter Nguyen Minh Duc
Vietnamese missonary in Samoa

Witness of Salesian Missionary Sanctity
Fr. Pierluigi Cameroni SDB, Postulator General for the Causes of Saints

Servant of God, Constantine Vendrame (1893-1957), a missionary in North East India. This August 27th is the 125th anniversary of his birth. His Argentinian voice echoed over hundreds of people in squares and meadows. They listened to his message of Christ with great eagerness. External show runs the risk of being mere straw fires if it is not accompanied by serious work. Don Vendrame did not wait for the pagans to come to him. After preaching "from the rooftops", he went looking for them, moving from hut to hut, and teaching them in their own homes.

Salesian Missionary Intention Per le vocazioni religiose alla vita salesiana
Per i Salesiani in Oceania

So that the Salesian Family may be able to witness to and proclaim the Gospel of the Family in Oceania.

Cultural, economic and political elements greatly influence the lives of families in Oceania, as anywhere else in the world. There is a great need to protect the treasure of the institution of the family, as the foundation of all Christian values and a school of humanity.